How I Lost and Found My Travel Mojo in Chiang Mai

Chiang Mai52

In the name of being honest and open, and not over-glamourising this adventure of ours, I'm going to tell you exactly how I lost my travel mojo - and then found it again -  in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Alan and I had entered our fourth month on the road and I had begun to grow weary.

I don’t expect you to feel sorry for me! After all, I am living my dream of travelling the world and on the whole couldn’t really be happier than I am right now. But travel burnout can be ruthless, it hits you in a way that makes you want to hibernate in your dark room, consoling your tired mind with a pointless spiral of youtube videos and endless Facebook feeds, rather than explore your exotic new surroundings.

Chiang Mai55

Despite aiming to stay 5+ nights in most places we visit, sometimes it is still exceptionally tiring to be packing, moving, planning, travelling and generally living without a home base. Sadness from departing our perfect little lifestyle on Koh Samui, sickness on Koh Tao, and a now very indefinite amount of time ahead until we temporarily ‘settle’ somewhere again had all added up to me feeling a bit uneasy and blue.

Chiang Mai44

Combined with my stress-inducing personality of we-must-be-busy-all-the-time, I was mildly exhausted. I was tired of sightseeing on a daily basis. Don’t hate me - but there are only so many temples you can admire, history you can absorb and local specialty foods you must try until you need a break.

Chiang Mai16

After a night’s stop over in Surat Thani back on the Thai mainland (see the very end of this post for details!), we flew the next day to Chiang Mai. Arriving in the afternoon, we were quick to hop on the back of a songthaew and make our way to the cheerful Buddy’s Guesthouse. I spent most of the evening stalking Buddy the pug (yep, the guesthouse is named after him!) until he eventually gave in and let me shower him with snuggly pug cuddles.

Chiang Mai28

We already knew that the next day we were not going to have time to see or do anything in Chiang Mai. It took a gruelling nine hours straight to nail our upcoming three weeks in China down to a tee, as whilst in Chiang Mai we had to apply for our China visas which are notoriously specific about your travel plans. A tasty plate of mango and sticky rice gave me the energy to power through the planning, and before we knew it we were up with the sun the following morning to queue outside the Chinese Consulate with our visa applications. Forms filled out, passports handed over and a gazillion pages of flight, accommodation and train booking confirmations later, it was now just a waiting game.

Chiang Mai27

On applying, the visas were to take four working days to process, excluding the weekend in the middle. We had a whole week ahead of us in Chiang Mai, passport-less and feeling unenthused. The worst thing about not having a passport in Chiang Mai is that as far as I am aware, you need it as a deposit for hiring a scooter - so we were on our own two feet for the entire time - which probably did us some good physically, but didn't give us the sense of freedom we love about hiring a scooter, and meant we didn't escape the city for any of its outer sights during our stay.

Chiang Mai54

Turns out, all I needed to get my travel mojo back was a break from my own exceedingly overboard need to do and see everything.  Before we arrived in Chiang Mai I had a list a mile long of what we would be doing while we were there. But when we arrived, and after some serious convincing from both myself and Alan, I threw any plans out the window and chose to listen to my instincts.

My body was telling me to just chill out and go with the flow. Nope, there wouldn't be any overnight trekking, no temple-hopping just to tick them off the list (we did visit a handful but in a very relaxed, unplanned sort of way), and no schedule. Each day would come and go exactly as we felt. Activities would happen if we felt like it and not if we didn't feel like it.

Chiang Mai21

Basically, I did my very best to ignore the voice in my head telling me what I 'should' be doing, and instead did what I felt like doing.

Of course, I always feel like eating, so ate tonnes of non-thai food and enjoyed every bite. Lasagne! McFlurries! Bagels! Vegemite sandwiches! Ice Cream Sundaes! Porridge! Mexican!

Margaritas were essential at Miguel's Cafe

Chiang Mai47

Proper English tucker at The Cafe Soi 1

Chiang Mai59

Delicious bagels at The Hideout (run by an Aussie guy who also offers vegemite and cheese sammies!)

Chiang Mai48

Swensen's because...ice cream.

Chiang Mai34

Lemon soft-serve at Lemon Hub - refreshing!

Chiang Mai18

Tanita Coffee House, where you can relax the entire afternoon away

Chiang Mai43

The sights of Chiang Mai just 'happened' upon us as we wandered around, rather than being planned - which is kind of magic. A holiday from our holiday, if you will.

When we weren't chilling in our room enjoying doing absolutely nothing or devouring all of the food ever, here's what we got up to.

Wat Chedi Luang

Chiang Mai29

Chiang Mai30

Chiang Mai31

Chiang Mai32

Wat Chiang Mun Chiang Mai26

Chiang Mai25

Chiang Mai24

Chiang Mai23

I found a swing!

Chiang Mai22

Wat Phra Singh

Chiang Mai08

Chiang Mai09

Chiang Mai10

Chiang Mai11

Chiang Mai12

Chiang Mai14

Chiang Mai15

Three Kings Monument

Chiang Mai20

The Night Bazaar, Saturday Market and Sunday Market

Chiang Mai04

Chiang Mai07

Chiang Mai03

Chiang Mai39

Chiang Mai40

Chiang Mai06

Chiang Mai05

Chiang Mai36

Chiang Mai37

Walking a loop of the city's moat

Chiang Mai50

Chiang Mai51

People-watching at Suan Buak Hat

Chiang Mai57

Chiang Mai58

Travelling long-term is different to being a tourist. This is among the lessons I am learning and slowly coming to terms with along the way. I don't have to see and do everything, everywhere. Downtime is perfectly acceptable. There is more to travel than sightseeing. Simply being in a place, eating up its food, soaking in its culture, wandering its streets, sipping a coffee whilst watching the world go by - each are perfectly valuable activities to experience a destination beyond its sights.

Chiang Mai45

Though I didn't visit all the 'must-sees' in Chiang Mai, I felt a lot more relaxed and in the swing of things when I left than I did when I arrived, and surely thats a good thing - right? Just in time too, because it was time to collect our passports, board yet another bus and conquer the 762 corners to our next destination: the quirky highlands town of Pai!

Have you ever lost your travel mojo? How did you get over it?

I haven't written a post on Surat Thani as we didn't have time to see or do anything there, but I simply must mention the hotel we stayed in as it was truly fantastic and I would recommend it to everyone! For a mere NZD$23 per night, we stayed in what felt like luxury at My Place @ Surat Hotel. They had a welcome sign with our names in the reception area, a personalised welcome message in the room with a fresh flower and on departure the following day gave us a handwritten postcard when we left thanking us for staying there. Five-star service - not to mention impeccably clean, nicely decorated and spacious rooms. The room was nicer than our hotel in Singapore that we paid more than triple per night for. A must-stay, for sure!


Thanks for reading! Let me know in the comments if you enjoyed this post. Don’t forget to follow me on BloglovinInstagram & Twitter and my brand-spankin' new Facebook page to keep up to date!



7 Responses to How I Lost and Found My Travel Mojo in Chiang Mai

  1. Dee V says:

    Holiday from your holiday 🙂 Awesomeness. Too easy to get burnt out on the road! Love love this post. PS I love the colourful long skirt that your wearing on the swing 🙂 xx

  2. Pingback: Eight things you MUST do in Pai, Thailand - The Butterfly Editions

  3. I’m not a full time traveler (yet) but I totally understand how it can become tiring. Always feeling the need to be on the go can definitely lead to burnout. Similarly, I’m that one on trips who doesn’t like just sitting around not seeing/doing everything a city has to offer…but I will remember that it’s okay to just relax and let it flow sometimes! Travel burnout never lasts too long anyway, eh?
    Awesome photos!

  4. Pingback: Travel Budget & Summary: Thailand - The Butterfly Editions

  5. Pingback: Five Travel Lessons I Learned the Hard Way - The Butterfly Editions

  6. Excellent article. I’ve been on the road for 5 months with a blip when I had to return to the UK. I’m at the point where if I see another colonial church, monastery, Spanish inquisiton museum, or speak to other travellers about the ‘must do trek’ in the area, I’ll scream! You are spot on, being a traveller is very different to being a tourist and I’ve found either longer beach stays or a few days holed up watching Netflix and walking around for just food (whilst spotting sights) is actually okay and nothing to be ashamed off 🙂 happy travels!

    • Christie says:

      Thanks for your comment – so sorry for my delayed reply! I totally hear you with what you are saying, and its comforting to know that other travellers have similar feelings occasionally about not being bothered with all the tourist stuff sometimes! Enjoy your travels 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *